Relapsing And What Happens after-rehab

Making A Comeback To Recovery

A component of the rehabilitation system is regression. You can still stop using the drug or alcohol even after you have relapsed.

Regardless of how diligently a recovery is pursued or the type of commitment you have for lifelong sobriety the chances of a relapse prevailing at some point remain present.

Feeling great remorse and shame after relapsing is common. The patient may feel defeated in his or her ordeal with recovery and decides to give in to the urge.


National Institute on Drug Abuse pegs relapse around 40% to 60% among recovering patients.


Notwithstanding the setback, this should be treated as an opportunity to regroup and re-evaluate the plan in order to bounce back stronger and better. By delving deeper into the root causes of the relapse you will be laying the foundation for a recovery which will ensure that you bounce back stronger than ever.


Relapse And The Reasons For It

Just when the patient thinks that he is off the habit, he finds himself caught in the web of relapse. Approximately 50% of all recovering addicts experience moments of weakness that take them back again and make them pick up drugs or alcohol all over again.

Prevention of this is possible with the awareness of the warning signals.

Our experts can find the most appropriate rehab program for you, so contact us today on 0800 772 3971.


An upcoming relapse may exhibit some signs, which can include the following

  • Not Being Serious About Your Sobriety
  • It helps to confirm and reaffirm your commitment to your goal otherwise, you are bound to go off-course.
  • In order to succeed you must be prepared to put in the hard work that is required to stay sober.
  • This can include attending the 12-step program, having a committed sponsor and getting the necessary therapy or counselling for possible co-occurring mental health conditions like depression and anxiety.
  • Not Having A Support System
  • A sober individual who has recently completed his or her recovery program to have a solid support network from the very onset because this can prove to be the difference between continued recovery or relapsing back into addiction.
  • Finding a positive helpline is very crucial to your success.
  • Work with someone that would hold you responsible for your actions, reflect on your situation and participate in sobriety group activities.
  • Not Being Committed To Being Sober
  • Many cases have been noted where the individual joins the treatment program because he or she is trying to please their family members or friends but do not have a commitment for quitting for themselves.
  • The odds of regression is greater unless the decision to stop is by oneself.
  • Lack Of Readiness For After Rehabilitation
  • It is important to have in place a relapse prevention plan for transitioning back to regular life after the treatment has been completed.
  • There are many factors that can affect you after you have recovered and you need to plan on how you will overcome them and stay sober for the rest of your life.
  • To stay sober, you need to recognize things than can trigger a relapse and create a plan to encounter them.

Ready to Get Help?

CALL US NOW ON 0800 772 3971



I Relapsed So Now What

On the other hand, you must go back to rehab if you are taking drugs regularly.

Upon reaching a decision regarding the treatment you should provide deeper emphasis for the therapy and in particular, cognitive-behavioural therapy [CBT] which has proven successful in teaching recovering addicts new behavioural responses to distorted thinking. Artistry and songs can be used in treatment, resting techniques; exercises and horse psychotherapy are among the additional treatments.


You must decide if undergoing rehab is necessary or not. It is advisable not to go through rehabilitation all over again because of one episode that may not repeat itself.

The main objective, at the start of rehabilitation after a regression, must strictly be achievement of normal living. You may learn that the best option to avoid a relapse is by entering a sober living environment for a few months where accountability and discipline can prove extremely helpful during the vulnerable initial few months post-treatment. After exiting from rehab, you need to have a plan already on how you are going to conduct your life.


Reach Out For Help That You Need

Assistance is procurable for those constantly in battle against imminent or ongoing regression despite complete rehabilitation. Join a de-addiction program that can help you live a sober life.